Gallery - Charleston - Supper

Gallery - Charleston - Supper
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THE FULL PLATE IN CHARLESTON

From Lowcountry classics to James Beard Award-winning chefs, this 10-course progressive supper is the ultimate (albeit impossible) Charleston tasting tour.

 

 

CAPER BLADES OYSTERS

THE ORDINARY

Plucked from the uncommonly clean waters of the ACE basin and then chiseled into selects, Capers Blades have an addictively briny finish. If in season, ask about Seaborn Ol’ Dangers, as well. Local waterman Cyrus Buffum likely raked them out that morning if they’re on ice. 544 King St, eattheordinary.com  

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SLOW-COOKED VEGETABLES

BERTHA’S KITCHEN

Three generations of women, starting with Albertha Grant in 1981, have tended the 10-burner stovetop at this Gullah institution, honored in 2018 a James Beard “America’s Classic” Award. Hustle over before they close at 6pm and snag a to-go styrofoam tray of slow-stewed collard greens, soft butter beans, crusty mac and cheese and square of cornbread. 2332 Meeting St

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FROGMORE STEW

BOWENS ISLAND

Bowens’ dockside dining area is perfect for this uncomplicated dish, a mix of peel-and-eat shrimp, corn, sausage and potatoes named for a village on nearby St. Helena Island. The fish-shack surroundings make everything taste better. 1870 Bowens Island Rd

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SHRIMP AND GRITS

HOMINY GRILL

If it weren’t a progressive “supper,” we’d recommend breakfast at Robert Stehling’s picture-perfect all-day café. (The fried chicken biscuit is worth ruining your lunch.) Since it’s evening, start with a spread of hot pepper jelly, cream cheese and water crackers, then dive into (prepare yourself, we’re planting a flag) the finest Shrimp and Grits in the South Carolina.  207 Rutledge Avehominygrill.com 

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TAVERN BURGER

LITTLE JACK’S

Restaurateurs Brooks Reitz and Tim  Mink have perfected the order combo we never knew we needed: Martini and a Burger. The latter being the show stealer. Cozy up to the LJ bar and note the careful burger details: a burger diameter small enough to qualify for appetizer status; slightly char-rimmed bun still soft to the squeeze; a smashed-down patty draped in melted American cheese; and just enough of a chef’s-special sunchoke relish that’ll perk up each bite. For real: It’s so good you’ll order another for dessert. 710 King St, littlejackstavern.com

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PULLED PORK

RODNEY SCOTT’S BBQ

Rodney Scott is a modern legend in American barbecue circles, earning lauds from the New York Times, Anthony Bourdain and pretty much everyone in the culinary universe. He honed his low-and-slow craft at the family’s slanted-roof country store in Hemingway, then in 2017, opened his own joint, in Charleston, just down the road from Little Jack’s. The new spot does fancy things like accept credit cards. But the principles (whole hogs, cooked for hours over red oak and hickory, baptized with pepper-citrus-vinegar sauce) remain wonderfully unchanged. Order a helping of the pork with a piece of white bread, and do like Rodney does: eat it like a taco. 1011 King St, rodneyscottsbbq.com

WHOLE RED SNAPPER

THE GROCERY

Dressed with fennel, lemon, and salsa verde, the local Beeliner snapper is big enough for groups—but don't be ashamed to tackle it solo. Chef Kevin Johnson is one of the city’s most respected chefs.   4 Cannon Stthegrocerycharleston.com 

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CAROLINA GOLD RICE

FIG

Perhaps the most consistently wondrous dining room in town, if not the region, chefs Mike Lata and Jason Stanhope (both James Beard Best Chef Southeast winners) aren’t afraid to push Lowcountry expectations on their menus, but they also let the local bounty speak for itself. “Rice is probably my favorite thing in the world,” Stanhope told us. “Especially Carolina Gold. It’s the nuttiest, starchiest, most floral rice I know. If you have rice at FIG, it’s probably not a week old.” The kitchen staff at FIG is constantly refining their menu, so find whatever dish rests on a bed of Carolina Gold and start there. 232 Meeting St, eatatfig.com

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FRIED HOMINY

WRECK OF RICHARD & CHARLENE

You’ll have to drive to the docks in McClellanville to find a more cinematic Lowcountry seafood spot than this Mount Pleasant classic. Yes, it’s on the touristy lists. Yes, you’ll make a wrong turn trying to find the right crushed shell road. But it’s worth trekking over on a quiet, cool-air, off-season night, especially for the crispy golden rounds of warm stone grits. The slap of boat lines stroll on the docks and parked trawlers resting nearby only up the experience. 106 Haddrell St, wreckrc.com

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COCONUT CAKE

PENINSULA GRILL

Back in the historic center of the Holy City, Peninsula Grill’s towering, 12-layer coconut cake is the unchallenged king of Charleston desserts. If you’re too stuffed, they ship the 12-pounder across the country. 112 North Market Stpeninsulagrill.com 

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